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3,000
We surveyed over 3,000 workers from China, Germany, and the United States to measure their levels of curiosity at work.
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8out of10
workers agree that curious colleagues are most likely to bring ideas to life.
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Curious workers are more likely to be ...
  • In leadership positions
  • Extremely satisfied at work
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95%
of workers say curiosity is at least somewhat important for discovering new ideas and solutions at work.
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67%
of workers feel they have experienced at least one barrier to practicing curiosity in their workplace.
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73%
of workers feel they experience at least one barrier to asking more questions at work.
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A majority
63%
of workers agree that a curious person is more likely to be promoted at work.
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Only
20%
of workers self-identify as curious.
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Only
9%
of workers feel the organizational culture at their workplace is extremely supportive of curiosity
Curiosity Barriers
  • Too little time to think creatively
  • Lack of financial support
  • Lack of professional development support
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Curiosity Enhancers
  • Autonomy in completing tasks
  • Time to explore ideas
  • Educational offers
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State of Curiosity
Breakthroughs begin with curiosity. But how important is it for workers to be curious in the workplace?
Let's find out
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