Literature List

Literature List

Dig a little deeper and discover more about the sources behind our curiosity content.

A Theory of Human Curiosity

Berlyne, D. (1954). A Theory of Human Curiosity. British Journal of Psychology, 45, 180-191.

This article explores curiosity as it relates to knowledge acquisition and why certain pieces of information are more interesting, sought after, and retained than other ideas.

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The Itch of Curiosity

Lehrer, J. (2010). The Itch of Curiosity. Wired.

This study demonstrates that curiosity can come from a desire for information, which explains why someone will seek new knowledge in order to scratch “The Itch of Curiosity”.

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Interesting Things and Curious People: Exploration and Engagement as Transient States and Enduring Strengths

Silvia, P., Kashdan, T. (2009). Interesting Things and Curious People: Exploration and Engagement as Transient States and Enduring Strengths. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 3(5), 785-797.

This article examines how intrinsic motivation, combined with curiosity and interest, allows for the acquisition of knowledge and identifies areas for future research.

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Introducing the construct curiosity for predicting job performance

Mussel, P. (2013). Introducing the construct curiosity for predicting job performance. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 34(4), 453-472.

This study asserts that curiosity can help explain work-related behavior and shows the rising importance of curiosity, which will likely result in changes in personnel management.

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From Experience Dreams to Market: Crafting a Culture of Innovation

Zien, K. S., Buckler, S. (1997). From Experience Dreams to Market: Crafting a Culture of Innovation. The Journal of Production Innovation Management, 14(4), 274-287.

This research identifies seven traits that are shared among innovative workplaces, regardless of industry, and explains how a company can create an innovative workplace culture.

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The Hungry Mind: Intellectual Curiosity as Third Pillar of Academic Performance

von Stumm, S., Hell, B., Chamorro-Premuzic, T. (2011). The Hungry Mind: Intellectual Curiosity as Third Pillar of Academic Performance. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 6, 574-588.

This research shows that effort and intellectual curiosity combined have an effect on academic performance comparable to that of intelligence. A “hungry mind” can influence academic success.

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Curiosity Management for More Innovation (Neugier-Management für mehr Innovation)

Naughton, C., Steinle, A. (2015). Curiosity Management for More Innovation. ZukunftsInstitut.

This article examines common barriers to workplace innovation and identifies autonomy, competence, and respect as three pillars that are central to ensuring a curious culture.

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Curiosity Management (Neugier-Management)

Steinle, A., Naughton, C. (2014). Curiosity Management. ZukunftsInstitut.

After recognizing that evolution has rewarded curious behavior, this study explores how companies can instill curiosity in their culture and employees to inspire innovation.

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Curiosity and Exploration: Facilitating Positive Subjective Experiences and Personal Growth Opportunities

Kashdan, T., Rose, P., Fincham, F. (2004). Curiosity and Exploration: Facilitating Positive Subjective Experiences and Personal Growth Opportunities. Journal of Personality Assessment, 82(3), 291-305.

This study shows how curiosity affects psychology by using a new tool to measure it along two dimensions: exploration (seeking something new) and absorption (engaging in an activity).

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